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Gynaecology

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Gynaecology

Gynaecology

Laparoscopy

What is it?
Laparoscopy is a surgery that uses a thin, lighted tube to look at the abdominal organs or female pelvic organs. The tube is inserted through an incision in the belly.

Who is it for?
A laparoscopy is used to identify problems such as cysts, adhesion, fibroids and infection. It can be used to check for and possibly remove abnormal growths in the abdomen or pelvis. It is sometimes used to check for and treat conditions such as endometriosis, ectopic pregnancy or pelvic inflammatory disease.

Recovery time
A laparoscopy takes 30 to 90 minutes, depending on what needs to be done, but can take longer if a condition is found and treated. You will need to recover for two to four hours after the procedure. Normal activities may be resumed the next day.

Risks
A patient may bleed from the incisions or an infection might occur. In extreme cases, there may be damage to an organ or blood vessel, which could require more surgery.

Hysteroscopy

What is it?
A doctor may use a hysteroscopy to look at the lining of a patient’s uterus. A thin, viewing tool called a hysteroscope is inserted into the vagina and gently moved through the cervix to the uterus. A light and a camera is attached to the hysteroscope so that the lining of the uterus (the endometrium) is displayed on a video screen.

Who is it for?
A hysteroscopy is usually done to find the cause of abnormal bleeding, or bleeding that occurs after a woman has passed menopause. It is also used to discover problems that may cause infertility, or to remove growths in the uterus, such as fibroids or polyps.

Recovery time
The procedure takes around thirty minutes and the patient should be able to go home on the same day. If an anaesthetic was administered, the patient needs to stay in hospital until it has worn off. A patient may need to avoid sexual intercourse, using tampons or exercising for a while after the hysteroscopy.

Risks
A hysteroscopy can cause injury to the uterus or cervix, an infection or bleeding. In rare cases, the uterus, bladder or bowel may be punctured during the test, requiring surgical repair.

Sterilisation

What is it?
Sterilisation is a permanent form of birth control that is extremely effective at preventing pregnancy. It does not, however, protect against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Who is it for?
Both men and women can be sterilised. For women, a tubal ligation is performed and for men, a vasectomy is performed. Tubal ligation involves sealing the fallopian tubes by using instruments inserted through a laparoscope. A vasectomy is performed by cutting the two vas deferens tubes through two small openings in the scrotum. The two ends of the vas deferens are then tied, stitched or sealed.

Recovery time
In the case of tubal ligation, the patient is able to go home a few hours after the procedure has been performed. The patient may resume normal activities after at least 24 hours. The vasectomy takes 20 to 30 minutes and the patient’s scrotum will be numb for one to two hours after the procedure. The patient may return to work in one or two days.

Risks
Major complications of tubal ligation are uncommon. Minor complications include infection and wound separation. Major complications include heavy blood loss or organ injury during surgery. The risk of complications after a vasectomy is very low. They may, however, include bleeding under the skin, which may cause swelling or bruising, infections at the site of the incision, or sperm leaking from a vas deferens into the tissue around it and forming a small lump.

Lletz

What is it?
The Lletz treatment aims to remove abnormal cells from the cervix. A wire loop with an electric current is used to shave off the cells. This leaves a raw area on the cervix which heals well.

Who is it for?
The procedure is one of the most commonly used approaches to treat high grade cervical dysplasia (i.e. abnormal cells on the cervix). The abnormal cells are removed to lower the risk of progress to cancer of the cervix.

Recovery time
The procedure involves a short stay in hospital, usually only a few hours. Patients may experience slight discomfort and pain, which may be relieved by taking pain medication. Patients should also avoid intercourse, swimming and heavy exercise fora few days in order to promote healing of the cervix and minimise the risk of infection.

Risks
Some women may develop infections after the procedure. Warning signs include heavy blood loss, a fever, severe pain or an offensive vaginal discharge.

Mirena Device

What is it?
The Mirena is an intrauterine device that is placed into a women’s uterus for the purposes of birth control. It can be kept in place for five years. The device releases progestin, which causes the cervical mucus to thicken so the sperm cannot reach the egg. The hormone also changes the lining of the uterus, so implantation of a fertilised egg cannot occur.

Who is it for?
The device is only used by women and is 98 – 99% effective for birth control.

Recovery time
The device is inserted by a doctor and the patient need not take any further steps to prevent pregnancy until such time as the IUD needs to be replaced.

Risks
IUDs rarely cause serious side effects. In rare cases, side effects may include pelvic inflammatory disease, painful and heavy periods, backaches and headaches. In very rare cases the IUD may end up outside the uterus in the pelvis.

Dilatation and Curettage

What is it?
This procedure refers to the opening of the cervix and surgical removal of part of the lining of the uterus, and/or contents of the uterus by scraping and scooping.

Who is it for?
The procedure is commonly performed in women for the diagnosis and treatment of gynaecological conditions leading to abnormal uterine bleeding. It is also used to remove the excess uterine lining in women who have conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome. It is also done to remove tissue in the uterus during or after a miscarriage or abortion, or to remove small pieces of placenta after childbirth.

Recovery time
It is a fairly quick procedure that could take 10 to 15 minutes. The patient remains in hospital for up to five hours after the procedure. Normal activities may resume after two days.

Risks
Common side-effects include cramping and spotting or light bleeding. Complications, such as a damaged cervix and perforated uterus or bowel are rare. Symptoms such as heavy or prolonged bleeding or blood clots, fever, pain and abdominal tenderness should be discussed with a doctor.

Gynaecology Specialist

Bernard, Nic

051 444 2292
Gynaecology Specialist

Cilliers, Francois

051 444 1692
Gynaecology Specialist

Cooreman, Bruno

051 436 8956
Gynaecology Specialist

De Beer, Johan

051 505 5559
Gynaecology Specialist

Diedericks, Andre

051 444 0133
Gynaecology Specialist

Heyns, Juliana

051 444 2288
Gynaecology Specialist

Jordaan, Do-Jo

051 444 0187
Gynaecology Specialist

Pretorius, Marise

051 522 2266
Gynaecology Specialist

Richter, Barry

041 374 3974 / 051 101 2606
Gynaecology Specialist

Van der Westhuizen, Nadia

051 444 2232
Gynaecology Specialist

Wessels, Paul

051 436 8956
Gynaecology Specialist

Zondagh, Inge

051 444 4224
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