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Orthopaedics

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Orthopaedics

Orthopaedic

Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

What is it?
Arthroscopic knee surgery is a procedure performed through small incisions in the skin to repair injuries to tissues such as ligaments, cartilage or bone within the knee joint area. The surgery is conducted with the aid of an arthroscope, which is inserted through incisions around the knee.

Who is it for?
Arthroscopic surgeries are used to treat acute injuries that destabilise the knee, or to manage pain in the case of floating or displaced cartilage and rough bone. Minor procedures include flushing or smoothing out bone surfaces or tissue fragments associated with osteoarthritis. More complex procedures include realignment of a dislocated knee and ligament grafting surgeries.

Recovery time
Surgery is usually brief and patients will be allowed to leave the hospital once the anaesthetic effects have worn off. Patients are not allowed to drive after the surgery. Follow-up visits are usually scheduled within about a week, at which point dressings will be removed.

Risks
Risks are rare, but they increase with the age of the patient. Blood clots are the most common danger, but they occur infrequently in arthroscopic surgery. Other risks include infections at the surgery site or at the skin level, bleeding and scarring.

Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery

What is it?
Arthroscopic shoulder surgery uses an arthroscope to examine and treat the interior of the shoulder joint. The arthroscope is inserted through a small incision in the shoulder.

Who is it for?
This type of surgery is commonly used to treat subacromial impingement, acromioclavicular osteoarthritis, rotator cuff tears, frozen shoulder, chronic tendonitis and partial tears of the long biceps tendon, as well as shoulder instability.

Recovery time
Patients will be allowed to leave the hospital once the anaesthetic effects have worn off, but with the arm in a sling. Recovery can range anywhere from one to six months, depending on the type of surgery, post surgery care and rehabilitation, and physical therapy.

Risks
Shoulder arthroscopy is a very safe procedure and complications do not occur often. Risks may, however, include bleeding, infection or blood clots, shoulder stiffness or weakness and loss of some or all sensation in the shoulder.

Surgical Removal of Ganglion

What is it?
Ganglions are small cysts that grow out of joint tissue. The goal of surgery is to remove the ganglion sac and connecting tissue that allows the fluid to collect. A local or regional anaestheticis injected to numb the area and the cyst is surgically removed. The incision is closed with stitches and bandaged.

Who is it for?
Surgical treatment may be needed for a ganglion that has not responded to nonsurgical treatment and is painful, interferes with activity or motion, becomes unsightly or is causing damage to wrist bones, finger bones or ligaments.

Recovery time
Patients may go home after the procedure is completed. Moving the area of surgery three to five days after the procedure is encouraged to prevent stiffness.

Risks
Infection and injury to other tissues are rare, but possible, risks of surgery. Ganglions may return in 5 to 10% of patients. This usually happens if the connecting tissue was not completely removed.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

What is it?
Carpal tunnel syndrome is described as pain, numbness or tingling in the hand because of pressure on the median nerve in the wrist. Surgery is used to reduce the pressure on the median nerve. This is done by cutting the ligament that forms the top of the carpal tunnel. Any other tissue that may be putting pressure on the median nerve can also be removed during surgery.

Who is it for?
Surgery for carpal tunnel is considered when symptoms do not improve after a long period of nonsurgical treatment, or when severe symptoms restrict normal daily activities (persistent loss of feeling or coordination in the fingers or hand, no strength in the thumb or when sleep is disturbed by pain).

Recovery time
Immediately after surgery, patients usually experience a decline in grip strength and dexterity. The scar may remain tender for up to a year.

Risks
Complications after surgery may include nerve damage with temporary tingling and numbness, infection, scarring, pain and stiffness. Some patients may experience a slight loss of wrist strength.

Tennis Elbow Surgery

What is it?
Tennis elbow is soreness or pain on the outer part of the elbow and occurs when the tendons that connect the muscles of the forearm to the elbow are damaged. Surgery for tennis elbow involves cutting the tendon and removing damaged tissue. In some cases, tendon tears are repairable if the repair can be done without overtightening the tendon.

Who is it for?
Surgery is considered if the elbow remains sore and painful after more than six to twelve months of tendon restand rehabilitation, or if a patient is not able to perform daily activities and job tasks because of elbow pain.

Recovery time
After tennis elbow surgery, a sterile bandage and splint is placed on the elbow. This allows the incision to heal. The splint is removed after about a week and the patient should begin to gently move the wrist and elbow. The patient may begin to lightly exercise the elbow after about six weeks.

Risks
The risks include slight loss of the ability to straighten the arm, elbow pain that persists or recurs, infection, blood loss or nerve damage.

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Du Plessis, FP

051 522 0606
Orthopaedic Surgeon

Greeff, Gerhard

051 522 2316
Orthopaedic Surgeon

Kruger, Johan

051 522 8731
Orthopaedic Surgeon

Rall, Werner

051 522 8731
Orthopaedic Surgeon

Visser, Evert

051 522 8731
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